4K

Scott Wilkinson on Home Theater

Episode 1436

Scott WIlkinson

Leo got the Apple TV 4K yesterday and says it looks really good. Scott says there's some really great stuff in it and he thinks it could be a Roku killer. It's very polished and crisp. Scott says that the one problem the Apple TV 4K has is that the up conversion feature isn't the best and as such, anything you watch that isn't 4K at 60p doesn't look all that great. Apple is planning to address the problem with a TVOS firmware update 11.02 which will feature "auto switching" that will fix the up convert problem.

Scott Wilkinson on Home Theater

Episode 1432

Scott Wilkinson

What is the real difference between 4K streaming and ultra Blu-ray discs? Scott Wilkinson says that most of the Ultra Blu-ray discs on the market are now 4K HDR. Streaming content is making the move to HDR, and several of the TV shows streaming are in 4K. Netflix is the leader in this. Stranger Things is going to be streaming in 4K HDR as well, but it won't be as good because of bitrate. It'll top out at about 25 Mbps streaming, and it's data compressed, while 4K Blu-ray HDR is about 100 Mbps uncompressed. Renting Blu-rays is an option, but finding HDR Blu-rays can be a challenge.

Scott Wilkinson on Home Theater

Episode 1426

Scott Wilkinson

Scott joins us to talk about a recent article he wrote on AVS Forum about whether 8K is already around the corner. We're going to see them at CES next January, you can bet. Scott says that 8K is a lot closer than we think, but that's only from the perspective of the TV manufacturers who want to sell upgraded TVs. Content is nowhere near around that same 8K corner. Scott says that TV manufacturers can do it so quickly because it won't cost them very much to transition to it in the LED lines.

Scott Wilkinson on Home Theater

Episode 1422

Scott Wilkinson

Scott went to the CEDIA convention last week and he's seeing more 4K projectors out there. Most of them are 1080p, but will accept a 4K signal that is a faux 4K because they "wiggle the pixels" (called Wobulation). There are a few true 4K projectors, but they're over $30,000. Scott also says there's no point in waiting for full 4K because it's going to be awhile before they are affordable, and by then, it'll be something completely different. Has projection seen better days? Scott doesn't think so. It's still the best way to get that cinematic immersive experience.

Do I need another video card for 4K?

Episode 1405

Roy from Pasadena, CA
Video card

Roy has a high resolution 4K monitor, but his friends say if he adds a second video card, it could give him better resolution. Is that true? Leo says no. A newer one with more RAM could help, but if he's driving the monitor at its full resolution, then it's not going to get any better than that. A second video card would give him the ability to add more monitors, though.

How can I livestream church services?

Episode 1400

Steve from Portland, OR
Mevo

Steve's church wants to do an online streaming broadcast. What's a good affordable option? Leo says that Livestream will stream via Facebook Live and YouTube Live. Livestream also has the Mevo, which is a camera that connects to the internet and streams directly to Facebook and YouTube. Since it has a 4k camera, Steve could get four different shots out of one camera by zooming in on different parts of the image.

Can I use my A/V Receiver with my new TV?

Episode 1396

Adam from Los Angeles, CA
HDMI

Adam has an A/V receiver, but it doesn't have HDMI. Can he still use it? Scott says not really, at least not for video. HDMI is the standard connection now in HDTVs, and if it doesn't have it, then he'll need a newer A/V receiver to handle the connection. If it had component, he may be able to get away with it, but it's not likely, and it still wouldn't be digital.