New Exploit Gives Governments the ability to hack into iPhone

Episode 1317

Remember the legal battle that Apple fought against the US Government to prevent unlocking of the iPhone's encryption? The US Gov't ended up going to a third party company who had created a hack to do it. Now that hack is being used to unlock and peer into the mobile phones of dissidents and other undesirable elements that the government wants to keep tabs on. Even reporters. Leo says that Apple has pushed out a fix to block it, and everyone should install iOS 9.5.3 to stop it. Otherwise, you're vulnerable.

Putin Signs New Law in Russia That Increases Surveillance of Citizens

Episode 1303

Russian President Vladimir Putin signed anti-terrorism legislation, including increased electronic surveillance of Russian citizens. This effectively removes all privacy as telephone companies and internet providers will save and store private communications of its customers and make it available to the government upon request. Phone calls, text messages, and emails will be kept for 6 months, and all metadata will be kept for up to 3 years. This also will outlaw encryption.

How can I have an anonymous free email?

Tim from Moorpark, CA

Episode 1287

Tim wants an email service that allows him to be anonymous. Leo says that ProtonMail is in Switzerland and they offer this service, but they will expect a secondary email address. Another option is Hushmail. It's not a free service, though.

Tim should remember that even with anonymous email, they still do have his IP address. And if someone really wants to find him, it's pretty hard to be invisible on the internet.

Microsoft Sues Feds Over Rampant Encroachment to Privacy

Episode 1279

Microsoft campus

Saying that the federal government has demanded personal data of their customers over 2500 times this year, Microsoft has sued the federal government demanding that the court rule on how the company must provide the information. According to the complaint, Microsoft is not allowed to tell their customers of the action, nor is there any expiration on the demands, effectively tying up the company forever. Microsoft is asking the court to rule and provide a level of transparency, and to act as a hedge against an overreaching government.

Why doesn't Facebook allow pseudonyms?

Episode 1271

Naomi from Denver, CO
Facebook sign

Naomi has been helping a senior with surfing the net through a Chromebook. Leo says that Chromebooks are a great option for people that have limited uses like just checking your email and Facebook. It's a solid option, especially for retired people. It's more secure, reliable, and far less expensive than a general purpose computer which is really overkill for most people's needs. A Chromebook is fantastic in that regard.

Could Apple be benefitting from fighting the FBI?

Episode 1264

Michael from Canyon City, CO

Michael says that the longer Apple can appeal and resist the court order, the better it looks for Apple. Leo says yes and no, because we now know that Apple's encryption isn't one way and that they can open any phone if they choose to give in to the FBI's demands. Leo suspects that Apple will eventually give in and when they do, there are encryption programs in 70 different nations that are uncrackable.

Are Google Chromebooks secure enough for use in schools?

Episode 1254

Janice from Tehachapi, CA
Samsung Chromebook

Janice is hearing that her school may be getting Chromebooks. But Janice is worried the school might not want to get them because of privacy concerns with all data being stored in the cloud. Leo says that the data will be in the cloud whether it's with Google or not. And it's understandable to be concerned. The EFF tells us that we should be. So it's a legitimate issue.