photography

Chris Marquardt on Photography

Episode 1284

Chris Marquardt

Chris' photo tip today is to pay close attention to shooting at wide angle. Often when you get a new wide angle lens, you assume it'll look the same, just more of it. But Chris says that the problem is that wide angle lenses also emphasis the depth of a picture, and that can cause an image to be a bit distorted. A camera doesn't really duplicate what you see, it duplicates what it sees. And photography is a process of seeing the world how a camera sees. And by doing that, you can hack the camera to come closer to the image and how you feel seeing it.

Chris Marquardt on Photography

Episode 1282

Chris Marquardt

Chris is back and this time he's taking viewer questions from the chatroom. G Scott wants to know if there's a perfect lens, that does everything. Chris says that everyone is looking for the swiss army knife kind of lens, but if you think about it, interchangable lenses are there for a reason. If a camera had a perfect lens that did everything, it would be installed into the camera and you couldn't swap them out. So you still need to choose the right lens for the right job. Having said that, Chris says that the 50mm "Nifty Fifty" is a must have.

Chris Marquardt on Photography

Episode 1280

Chris says that when you've finished taking your pictures and you input them to your computer, using post processing to make them the best is a great tip to make your images better. There's a simple thing to get your exposure right and that's to make sure the whites are ... white. If they're white, even if you've overexposed, having the whites right will help a lot. Take your photo editor and switch it off full screen. Then take a text editor document with plain white. This will tell you what your computer's max brightness looks like.

Send Postcards with PhotoCard for iOS

Leo Laporte recently interviewed Bill Atkinson, one of the fathers of the Mac, on Triangulation episode 244. During his time at Apple Computer, he created QuickDraw, an integral part of the graphical user interface, MacPaint, and HyperCard, which made programming accessible to non-programmers. In addition to this, he's been a lifelong photographer and pioneer of digital printing technologies. Recently, Bill Atkinson created an iOS app called PhotoCard, an app for sending quality photographs as postcards.

Chris Marquardt on Photography

Episode 1274

Chris Marquardt

Chris is back from his vacation in Tuscany. Sadly, he didn't take many pictures due to a storm that rolled through. But then he went to Siberia for a photo tour and he got some amazing shots of Lake Baikal, the world's largest fresh water lake that's about 1 mile deep and holds 20% of the world's water. Temperature differences are massive, swinging fro -40° to 104°. It's gorgeous because as the lake freezes over, the ice is clear and stunning. From a photography point of view it was very interesting. While it was cold, it wasn't as cold as he expected.

How can I share my photos online?

Old Geek from New York

Episode 1272

Old Geek wants to share his sketches with friends. What's the best option? Leo says that uploading images to Google Photos is a great option. He can upload scans or photos of his sketches to Google Photos and then share links to his images to anyone he wants. He can also use a sharable folder and then send the link to the folder for them to enjoy. He could also use Flickr and Facebook.

Anthony Tortoriello on Photography

Episode 1272

Today's tip for the week is all about photo composition. Have an area of interest in every corner of the frame. If something is in frame that isn't interesting, recompose. Get low. Change your perspective. That will give you a different look. Anthony usually roughs in his composition with his iPhone, like a polaroid. That gives him instant feedback to what the shot will look like. It's very natural. Leo has learned the acronym FART: The "feeling" of what grabs you in what you're seeing, "Ask" yourself what's grabbing you, "Refine" it, then "Take" the shot.

Anthony Tortoriello on Photography

Episode 1270

Photographer Anthony Tortoriello chimes in with a few ideas about photo apps. Apps he uses include Camera+, which is great for Macro. It also has the ability to turn on the rule of thirds grid, which is great for keeping horizons level. Photo editing apps include Snapseed by Google. It's great for sharpening and pinpoint adding of contrast and lighting. You can also add captions and watermarks, and touch/retouch.