photography

Chris Marquardt on Photography

Episode 1290

Chris Marquardt

Chris says that it becomes very easy to "fall off the horse" when you're comparing your quality of photography with others. People shouldn't be discouraged. Just be patient. It takes time and practice to develop your eye and style. That's the beauty of digital photography -- you can make mistakes and learn from them at little cost. At the beginning you're not going to be all that great as your taste vs. your quality of work is separated. But as you keep at it, that gap narrows and you eventually get there. Here's a few tips to keep you going:

How can I edit RAW photos?

Todd from Inglewood, CA

Episode 1288

Todd has a Canon 5D Mk. III and he has been shooting JPG. He's starting to shoot RAW now and needs a program to edit them. Leo says the 5D Mk. III allows him to shoot RAW + JPG. That's pretty good because it gives him the option of either. RAW gives him a lot of latitude for color correction and post processing and Adobe Lightroom works great for converting it. It also has a simple workflow.

What's a good camera for recording and shooting stills at a concert?

Episode 1288

Steve from Duluth, MN
Sony RX100 Mk 2

Steve is going to Oldchella and wants to bring a great camera to shoot it. He has the Sony RX 100 Mk. II. Leo says that's perfect. Should get a used Sony RX 1 though? Leo says if he can get a good price on it. The RX 100 has a very fast lens and a 1" sensor. It also has a full frame sensor. So either would be great.

Chris Marquardt on Photography

Episode 1286

Chris Marquardt

Why shoot film? Chris says that one compelling reason is that we've learned to delay decisions when we shoot digital. Shooting on film makes you think about exposure, aperture, and framing. All those things that you can fix in post. Shooting in film makes you think about it more first. But even then, you can scan the image into your computer and adjust it. Some developers will even give you a CD of your images when you have them developed.

Chris Marquardt on Photography

Episode 1284

Chris Marquardt

Chris' photo tip today is to pay close attention to shooting at wide angle. Often when you get a new wide angle lens, you assume it'll look the same, just more of it. But Chris says that the problem is that wide angle lenses also emphasis the depth of a picture, and that can cause an image to be a bit distorted. A camera doesn't really duplicate what you see, it duplicates what it sees. And photography is a process of seeing the world how a camera sees. And by doing that, you can hack the camera to come closer to the image and how you feel seeing it.

Chris Marquardt on Photography

Episode 1282

Chris Marquardt

Chris is back and this time he's taking viewer questions from the chatroom. G Scott wants to know if there's a perfect lens, that does everything. Chris says that everyone is looking for the swiss army knife kind of lens, but if you think about it, interchangable lenses are there for a reason. If a camera had a perfect lens that did everything, it would be installed into the camera and you couldn't swap them out. So you still need to choose the right lens for the right job. Having said that, Chris says that the 50mm "Nifty Fifty" is a must have.

Chris Marquardt on Photography

Episode 1280

Chris says that when you've finished taking your pictures and you input them to your computer, using post processing to make them the best is a great tip to make your images better. There's a simple thing to get your exposure right and that's to make sure the whites are ... white. If they're white, even if you've overexposed, having the whites right will help a lot. Take your photo editor and switch it off full screen. Then take a text editor document with plain white. This will tell you what your computer's max brightness looks like.