malware

Is there a third party option to Dell's Click to Fix?

Brett from Woodbridge, NJ

Episode 1296

Brett has a Dell computer and wants to know if there's an open source program that can speed up his computer like Dell does with Click to Fix? Leo says that Dell doesn't share their secrets and Leo doesn't think that it's safe to use a third party open source option for this. Dell's Click to Fix knows its own hardware and as such, can do a targeted fix. Open source stuff can't do that and can be overly aggressive and cause more problems than it fixes.

Why can't I visit links I get in email?

Al from Chino, CA

Episode 1292

Al recently upgraded to Windows 10 and Chrome has been giving him error messages preventing him to go to certain sites. Leo says to trust that. It's likely that the site has some malware code in it that will cause issues down the line. It could be a generic warning though. To be safe, Al shouldn't click on any links. Instead he should hover over it to see what the actual link is. It's possible to spoof a link with HTML code. In fact, Leo suggests turning off HTML in his email client. Leo suggests also using Thunderbird. It will give him the option of text only.

Why does my system tray have an EXE file in it?

Nicki from Los Angeles, CA

Episode 1291

Nicki saw an .exe file she didn't recognize in her system tray. Leo says that system trays hold icons of programs that are running and if she hovers over them, she should get some information. It could also be an error. It's causing security issues and Windows won't load her antivirus. It could be an infection, so she should update her antivirus or use Microsoft's Malicious Software Removal Tool.

Is my computer safe from hackers?

Kevin from California

Episode 1285

Kevin's mom went to a website and got a virus alert. She then called the phone number on it and they had her install something, which gave them control over her computer. Leo says that's a common scam. They probably installed a virus and maybe even turned her computer into a bot. The worst part is that they took her money and now have her credit card number. She realized her error and called him, though, and Kevin has since changed her passwords. She has trouble remembering passwords. Leo says many do and they end up using the same password over and over.

Can my Android phone get infected by a virus?

Tom from Riverside, CA

Episode 1273

Tom has a Samsung Galaxy Note V with Sprint. Lately he's been getting a warning of being infected. Leo says that's nonsense. We're starting to see these popups in mobile phones like we did running a browser in Windows. It's likely a phishing attempt to get him to buy something. Tom should just keep his phone up to date when a patch is offered from his provider, and he'll be fine. He's not infected.

Why does SiteLock keep reporting that my site has malware?

Steve from Rancho Mirage, CA

Episode 1268

Steve said that he's been a HostGator customer for 9 years and had been very happy. They are associated with SiteLock, a site that scans websites to check for malware. His site got infected with malware, and SiteLock reported that to HostGator, who notified Steve they were going to take down his site. When he called HostGator, they forwarded him to SiteLock, and they presented him with an option to clean up his site for $300 or subscribe to a monthly service that would cost $97 a month.

How can I get rid of malware?

Carolyn from Pasadena, CA

Episode 1268

Carolyn thinks she got attacked by a virus. MalwareBytes says there's over 174 viruses on her machine. Leo says there might not be. There may be malware on it, but sometimes Malware Bytes gives a false positive on cookies and calls them viruses. She'll also want to be sure that she got MalwareBytes from the >official MalwareBytes site. Carolyn really should just make a recovery, back up her data, wipe the drive, and then run the recovery utility. It's the only way to be sure that she's free of viruses.