malware

Jackpotting Attack Hits US ATMs

Episode 1458

ATM

There's a new attack that has been affecting ATMs around the world, and it's called "Jackpotting." It causes ATMs to dispense all of its cash. Hackers are using endoscopes to gain access to the interior of an ATM in order to connect to it and hack into the ATM's Windows XP operating system. Then, the once the malware is installed, a remote command is given to spew out 40 bills every 23 seconds.

Read more at krebsonsecurity.com.

Does a popup saying I'm infected mean I've been hacked?

Episode 1457

Jay from Long Beach, CA
uBlock Origin

Jay keeps getting a popup when surfing that says he's been infected with a virus. Should he be worried? Leo says no. Chances are, it's the website that has been hacked, and a piece of javascript has been put into that site. If he closes out the website, it simply goes away. It may also end up being some sort of extension that got installed in his browser. Jay should clear out all his extensions and it should solve it.

Is my Mac infected with malware?

Episode 1457

Brad from Wells, NV
MacBook Pro

Brad accidentally downloaded some malware, but he can't find it to remove it. Leo says downloading a file is only half the equation. He then would have to run it. Since he can't find it, even in his download log, it's likely it was a failed download. On top of that, Brad runs a Mac, so he's even more secure than Windows. But he should always make sure he keeps his computer updated, just in case.

Spectre and Meltdown Flaws Continue To Plague Intel

Episode 1457

With the now infamous Spectre and Meltdown processor flaws affecting every intel based computer for the last ten years, Intel pushed out a fast fix to plug the holes. Now they're saying not to use it. It seems that some computers will get stuck in a reboot loop. So the cure is worse than the disease. To date, there's been no evidence that the Spectre and Meltdown flaws have been exploited, so Leo is wondering if the right advice is to do nothing at all. At least until a new fix has been released, or that malware shows up that will take advantage of it.

Why is my browser typing strange text?

Episode 1450

Jeff from Apple Valley, CA
Laptop keyboard

Jeff is getting strange random key strokes appearing in his browser bar. Leo says to try a different browser. Windows comes with both Edge and Internet Explorer. If it happens in both browsers, it could be a failing keyboard. Jeff should unplug his keyboard and try a new one. If he still has the issue, then it's a Windows problem, which could be malware or a browser hijack. He could try resetting his browser first. If that solves the problem, then he's fine. If not, then it may be that he'll need to reinstall Windows from a known good source.

Processor Hack Affects All Computers Made in Last Ten Years

Episode 1451

Processor

The latest exploit "Spectre" affects every single chip made in the last ten years. At first, security researchers thought that the exploit only affected Intel processors, but it turns out this hack also effects ARM, AMD, and any other processor that uses speculative prediction. The white hat hackers who found the flaw discovered that you can use it to access valuable data including passwords and other information. Leo says that Microsoft has already pushed out a fix, and Apple's High Sierra has patched the vulnerability with a recent fix. Apple has also patched the iPhone and iPad.

CCleaner Contained Malware for Months

Episode 1429

CCleaner

Avast/Piriform has confirmed that its popular CCleaner app has been infected with malware for the last several months and that users who have used it may have had their computer's compromised. Avast says they believe that they've fixed the problem and that no users have been harmed by the hack. But Leo says he worries about the term "we believe," and this is yet another reason why using these kinds of apps to protect yourself gives you a false sense of security.

Did an AVS take over my computer?

Episode 1421

Scott from Denver, CO
https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Avast_Software_logo_2016.svg

Avast has installed something called "Grime Fighter" and it's taken over Scott's computer. What can he do? Leo says this is why he's not in favor of using third party antivirus software anymore. They give you a false sense of security and it can open up additional vulnerabilities. Leo suspects that Grime Fighter is not from Avast, but instead is pretending to be. At this point, the only thing you can really do is back up your data, format your hard drive, and reinstall Windows from a known good source. And if you must have an AVS, use Microsoft's own Windows Defender.