home theater

Scott Wilkinson

Episode 1113

Scott is back to talk about compression. Leo says that MP3 (or AAC for Mac) powered the music download revolution because it eliminated over 90% of the file size through compression. But now that we're in the broadband era, could we get back lossless compression like ELAC? Scott says that the dirty secret about hi-res audio is that in many cases, music companies are taking the same CD files and just resamplling them. So you're not really getting a lossless file. Leo says that would be a rip off if true. Scott says it's also not hard to upsample the clips by using a spectrum analyzer.

Scott Wilkinson and the Value Challenge

Episode 1109

Scott Wilkinson

Scott joins us to talk about the annual Value Electronics Flat Panel Challenge. The challenge pits the top LCD, Plasma and other flat screen TVs one on one in a huge shoot out to determine what is the bottom line best HDTV on the market. They invite professional calibrators, consumers, bloggers and journalists to join them for two days of testing and for the first time, they'll be streaming the challenge live.

Scott Wilkinson and the UHD Color Gamut

Episode 1105

This week on Home Theater Geeks, Scott had Joe Kane as his guest to talk about hi definition color space in television. Leo says that it's a good show to watch because the next generation TVs will not only have higher resolution and frame rates, but also color space that goes beyond the limits of the human eye. Scott says that current TVs don't reproduce red very well. It tends to look more orange. But the new Ultra HD TVs will. Sadly, the content will have to catch up and expand their range of colors to take advantage of that color gamut.

Scott Wilkinson and Dawn of the Planet of the Apes

Episode 1103

Scott saw Dawn of the Planet of the Apes and he says it's great. Fantastic motion capture performances by actors who played the apes and then filmmakers digitally replaced their bodies with CGI apes that looked incredibly realistic. And because motion capture does just that, capture the actor's movements, the performance gets mimicked by the virtual actor. Especially with small cameras pointing at his face in order to capture the emotional tone of this face and then apply that to the digital character. Amazing.

Why won't my Amazon Fire TV work with my AV receiver?

Episode 1102

Joe from Austin, TX
Denon AV Receiver

Joe got an Amazon Fire TV, but when he plugs it into his Denon AV receiver it doesn't work. Leo says he likes the Denon AV receiver and can't imagine why it wouldn't work. Everything in the chain is "HDCP" complaint for copy protection. So it should work just fine.

Leo thinks it may be a bad port or bad cable. Make sure the settings from the Fire TV and the TV itself are matched. If one is 1080i and the other is 1080p, then the handshake could fail. Turn everything off and unplug it. Then plug each thing in one at a time, ending with the TV.

Scott Wilkinson

Episode 1101

Scott Wilkinson

Scott had a guest on Home Theater Geeks this week named Michael Fremer. He is a pure audiophile and enjoys it because of his "golden ears" (being able to pick up on subtle musical cues). He says that high resolution audio is a great development. Leo says that paying more for HiRes audio is a subjective thing. Most won't be able to really enjoy it like someone with golden ears, but if it sounds better to him, then it's worth it.

Scott Wilkinson

Episode 1099

Scott is back to talk about Vizio's new 70" LED LCD screen. Scott likes it because it's great value for the money and offers local dimming through back lit zones which allow for more accurate blacks and colors on the screen. Vizio has also officially killed 3D as an option on their screen. Scott says if you look at the model number that ends in the letter "A," it's a 2013 model, and "B" is a 2014 model. And 2014 models will be back lit, not edge lit. So look for "B" models. Also, 70" TVs are ideal for viewing at 10 feet. If you can afford it, that's what you should get.

Amplify Dialog in Movies and TV Shows

Sometimes, it can be difficult to hear the dialog in movies and TV shows. Fortunately, there are a few things you can do about it.

If you're listening on the TV's internal speakers, open the TV's audio menu and see if there are bass and treble controls. If so, turn down the bass and/or turn up the treble while watching something with people speaking, but do it only as much as necessary to make the dialog understandable.

Even better, connect a soundbar to the TV, which will improve the sound quality overall and dialog intelligibility in particular.