home theater

Scott Wilkinson

Episode 1189

Scott Wilkinson

This week on HTG, Scott is having on Jim Hellman, an expert in high dynamic range cinema and how it's really making the movie image pop and will be a main focus in the standards of 4K and ultra high definition.

Scott says that HDR will change the way we see movies. But Leo believes that it could be much ado about nothing since people are generally happy with their HDTVs. Scott says that HDR has the promise to drive people back to the theaters, rather than wait to watch movies on their home theater system.

Scott Wilkinson

Episode 1187

Scott is going to see Disney's Tomorrowland this week and he gets to see it in Dolby Cinema, Dolby's new Laser projection system. Scott says that Tomorrowland is the first movie to be featured with Dolby's new High Dynamic Range format. Scott says that HDR may just get more people to go back to the movies, rather than just rely on their HD Home theater systems to watch a movie.

Scott Wilkinson

Episode 1185

Scott Wilkinson

Scott spend the week watching Avengers: Age of Ultron in various versions, including 3D and laser projected. He's coming around to Leo's point of view that 3D just isn't that great a format. Laser projection, by contrast, gives you a brighter image, and when it's Laser 3D, it works quite well unless you wear prescription glasses, where the polished inner surface bounces light around and the reflection is quite distracting. So he's quickly starting to see Leo's point. Leo likes the idea of immersion, and the more realistic a movie the better.

What are my options to replace Windows Media Center?

Episode 1184

Brian from San Clemente, CA
Plex

Brian has a home theater setup with a home theater PC and he's worried that Windows has abandoned the Home Theater PC concept, including Windows Media Center. Leo says that it has been a long time coming since Microsoft has killed Windows home server in favor of Windows 8. Now killing Windows Media Center is just part of that. Microsoft doesn't want to be in the media center business, they want customers to get an XBox One.

Scott Wilkinson

Episode 1183

John from New York calls in to ask Scott a Home Theater question - John has a Samsung Plasma HDTV that's starting to get horizontal lines and was told that to avoid replacing it, if he can replace the "Y axis" board to repair it. Thoughts? Scott says that it could be some sort of driver circuitry and it begs the question ... should you repair it or replace it with an LED TV. The rule of thumb is to keep replacement parts for up to 7 years, so there may be parts available for at least the next few months.

How can I connect my home theater to my TV?

Michael from Monrovia, CA

Episode 1179

Michael bought a home theater in a box, a Panasonic A/V receiver, and a 55" Samsung TV. He has Dish TV service. He's having issues hooking everything up, though.

Leo says that everything should go through the Panasonic A/V receiver. He needs to connect the components like the blu-ray player with HDMI cables to the HDMI input on the Panasonic receiver. Then there should be one HDMI output on the receiver, and that will go to the HDMI In on the TV. If he connects the receiver to HDMI 1 on the TV, then the TV should stay on HDMI 1 all the time.

Scott Wilkinson

Episode 1179

Scott returns from NAB this week, after spending a week walking the halls and seeing the latest in broadcast and film technology. Leo says that it's become more and more about that, rather than the inside technology of engineers. There's a lot more focus on streaming media. Scott agrees, and says that TWiT is ahead of that curve, blazing the trail. Scott says he likes to go to NAB because seeing what broadcasters are working on points the way to what consumers will go with. And 4K was everywhere.

Scott Wilkinson

Episode 1175

Scott Wilkinson

This week's question comes from Phil, who is an audiophile. He bought a Pono Player and he's not impressed by the high resolution tracks, which are more expensive at $8-18 a CD. He only found them marginally better than ripped CDs saved at FLAC. Leo says that's interesting. It's only slightly more expensive in his opinion and Phil can tell the difference.