home theater

Scott Wilkinson at NAB

Episode 1073

Scott Wilkinson

Scott is back from NAB in Las Vegas, where he says the show has become more for content creators and not just for broadcasters. GoPro had a huge presence there, as did Blackmagic, Canon, Panasonic, JVC, and Sony, which all had broadcast quality consumer cameras. Scott likes that the technology he sees there ends up trickling down to the consumer market.

Scott Wilkinson and NAB in 4K

Episode 1071

Scott Wilkinson

Scott is heading to NAB this week to see what the professionals are doing with 4K. Scott is interested because it will largely impact the standards of ultra high definition moving forward, and that will greatly drive the consumer market. But how will content be graded by pros to take advantage of the new standard? That hasn't been determined yet and Scott will see where it's going at NAB. There's also trends in high dynamic range and color gamut, which are going to provide a broader range of colors with ultra high definition.

Scott Wilkinson and HDMI 2

Episode 1069

Scott attended a webinar this week on HDMI 2.0, a new home video connection cable standard. He said it's a bit confusing. You can use the same cables you have now, which is a nice thing, and HDMI's category 2 cables have a bandwidth of 10.1 gigabits per second. Even though HDMI 2 is 18GBps, they can still work. It's not necessarily about the version number, it's the list of features it brings to the party. It depends on what the manufacturer decides to support, though.

Can I run both DirecTV and cable on the same TV?

Episode 1068

Jim from Cypress, CA
HDMI

Jim wants to run both DirecTV and Time Warner Cable off the same TV. Leo says he can do it via the HDMI ports on the back of the TV. Then he can just switch from one source to the other. But he'll need a separate cable for it. Can he do it wirelessly? Leo says that wireless HDTV is a difficult thing. It's always best to go wired through HDMI.

Scott Wilkinson

Episode 1067

Scott Wilkinson joins us to talk about audio sampling. Leo became a Kickstarter backer for a company called Pono this week, which says that audio is way too compressed and oversampled, leaving the pure audio experience wanting. Neil Young's Pono seeks to change that. Leo says that he would like to hear music at the highest possible quality, as if you were hearing it while being in the same room. You don't get that with the current state of the art - mp3s.

What's causing the audio issues in my Blu-ray player?

Episode 1065

David from Harbor City, CA
Sony Blu-Ray Player

David has a Blu-ray player in his home theater that can run Netflix. When he switches back to TV, he's getting audio issues, though. Leo says that he has a similar problem and it's the TV set that tells the receiver what audio to play. It's a fault in the hand shaking and Leo says it's very common. Leo also advises making sure his HDMI cable is secure. Often it can get loose, causing connection errors. Make sure everything is plugged in solid. There's also issues in shifting from 720p-1080i-1080p. Scott thinks it may be a fault in the cable box.

Scott Wilkinson Gets Wired

Episode 1065

Scott Wilkinson

Scott Wilkinson joins us right after the talk about cat6 Ethernet to talk home theater. Scott says that as we get more and more into 4K, and as ultra high definition gets into the home, the need for high quality compression and high speed routing is very important. Not only is resolution important, but color gamut is as well, since it provides a smooth gradient of color. We're already running into the limits of HDMI 2.1 with those specs. Leo says that HDMI over Ethernet can be done with baluns on either end to convert from HDMI to Ethernet and back.

Scott Wilkinson

Episode 1059

Scott Wilkinson

Scott is back with questions about how 4K will affect 3D and what glasses would be best. Sony uses both, but Samsung and LG both use passive technology. Vizio went with the passive glasses in 2013, but this year they dumped 3D altogether. Scott says he likes passive glasses because they're lighter and the TVs are more affordable. Passive is brighter, but even then it only lets in 50% of the light. Active glasses lets in only 30% of the light, and you have to recharge them or change the batteries. Scott also says the one good thing is that 4K offers 1080p in each eye for 3D.