HDR

Scott Wilkinson on Home Theater

Episode 1267

Scott Wilkinson

Scott keeps getting the question of which high dynamic range (HDR) capable TV to buy. Scott says there's an important distinction between "HDR compatible" and "HDR capable." HDR compatible just means it takes the HDR signal and downgrades it to standard dynamic range. HDR capable, on the other hand, can actually display an HDR picture. Over at AVS Forum, Scott has made a list of HDR capable TVs from 2015 and 2016.

Scott Wilkinson on Home Theater

Episode 1247

Scott Wilkinson

Scott hasn't seen Star Wars: The Force Awakens yet, but he has heard nothing but good things. It seems that most people are writing reviews just saying that they like it, and not giving any plot details. Leo says that it's on track to be the highest grossing opening film of all time. As for 3D, there's really nothing in the movie that takes advantage of it. It was largely invisible. Scott says that's why he's going to see it at the El Capitan in Dolby Vision with Dolby Cinema High Dynamic Range.

Scott Wilkinson on Home Theater

Episode 1239

Scott Wilkinson

Black Friday is coming this week and Scott says there's going to be some amazing deals on Samsung TVs. And you don't have to wait in line to get them, you can shop online. Scott is seeing deals of up to 60% off really good JS UHD models that have high dynamic range. Scott says it's likely to clear out inventory to make room for the 2016 models which will come out in the Spring. Leo says that the deals are unbelievable, especially coming directly from Samsung. Sony is going to have some deals as well, but we haven't seen details yet.

Scott Wilkinson on Home Theater

Episode 1225

Scott Wilkinson

Scott joins Leo to talk about the new Chromecast audio. He says that the key for him is if it'll have the Tidal service, and if the quality is there, it could sound just like a CD. And what's cool is that it'll be available in any room in the house. Leo says not only that, but it empowers any wireless speaker to be a stereo. The real question is latency, especially in party mode. Scott says that Google will be bringing that in a firmware update. Leo also says if they tie Google Now to it, the party is over for Sonos.

Scott Wilkinson on Home Theater

Episode 1217

Scott Wilkinson

Scott says that Vizio has dropped 3D completely from its entire line of HDTVs and is moving towards High Dynamic Range. Leo says that some people are confused between HDR and high frame rate, or HFR. Scott says that some TV makers are still in the HFR camp and many people don't like it because of it makes the image look like a soap opera. Scott also says that LCDs can make the problem worse with motion blur and then frame interpolation is applied that makes the image look even more plasticy. How can you get rid of the soap opera effect? Look for black frame insertion.

Scott Wilkinson

Episode 1205

Scott Wilkinson

Scott saw "Pixels" and he enjoyed it because it appealed to his inner nerd. The graphics are gorgeous. He went to see it because it was shown in Dolby Vision's High Dynamic Range. There's only five theaters in the US that support it. The next movie in HDR will be Mission Impossible: Rogue Nation.

Scott Wilkinson

Episode 1197

Scott Wilkinson

Scott really wants to see Inside Out because it's being shown in high dynamic range laser projection. But he's busy getting ready for CE Week, the midterm CES conference in New York. While there, he's also going to attend the Value Electronics TV Panel shootout between the best TVs from each of the manufacturers. Joe Kane is also doing a presentation on High Dynamic Range TV, which Scott says looks stunning, and that Samsung will be first out of the gate to offer an HDR TV.

Scott Wilkinson

Episode 1189

Scott Wilkinson

This week on HTG, Scott is having on Jim Hellman, an expert in high dynamic range cinema and how it's really making the movie image pop and will be a main focus in the standards of 4K and ultra high definition.

Scott says that HDR will change the way we see movies. But Leo believes that it could be much ado about nothing since people are generally happy with their HDTVs. Scott says that HDR has the promise to drive people back to the theaters, rather than wait to watch movies on their home theater system.