How can I prioritize online gaming with my router?

Brant from New York

Episode 1213

Brant has an issue that when he's gaming online, and someone else starts streaming Netflix, suddenly he gets a lot of latency. Leo says that's just because his bandwidth goes down because there's so much being used. One thing Brent can try is QOS (quality of service) where he can set his router to prioritize bandwidth traffic through the ports that gaming and streaming apps use.

Does a larger mobile phone screen use more data?

Jeffrey (Captain J) from Port Charles, Florida

Episode 1213

Jeffrey wants to know if a larger screen phone uses up more data than a smaller screen phone. Leo says that it could the case when streaming video. Sites like Netflix and YouTube will notice that you're using a high resolution screen and automatically stream higher resolution video, and that definitely uses more data.

Why is my internet access slow when uploading photos to Google Drive?

Rick from Torrance, CA

Episode 1192

Rick has Google Drive, and he's noticed his internet slows down when it's syncing data. Leo doesn't think this is a likely cause for slowing down his internet, because these programs are supposed to be "nice" -- they only will use a small fraction of the available bandwidth. Rick can pause the activity on Google Drive to see if that makes a difference. It could take up more bandwidth during the initial sync.

How can I get a better signal to my Roku box?

Episode 1172

Archie from Hawthorne, CA

Archie has a Wi-Fi router and has connected his Roku, but he's not getting good enough reception and it buffers a lot. Leo says the farther the router is from the Roku, the less connection can be made. But Leo also suspects that the router isn't giving Archie as much bandwidth as he needs. It could be due to congestion.

If his router supports the 5 GHz band, it's a much better choice for streaming. He can also take the old router and put it in bridge mode and use it as a repeater to pass along the signal.

Is internet TV a bad idea?

Lunella from Los Angeles, CA

Episode 1163

Lunella doesn't like the idea of TV being on the Internet. It just uses too much data. Leo says that there's more bandwidth available that we currently use, and it can be expanded infinitely. Having said that, the bottle neck occurs in the "last mile," where the ISP isn't providing enough bandwidth. The real issue is power consumption.

If I change my ISP, will I lose my email address?

Tamar from Los Angeles, CA

Episode 1160

Tamar has been using AT&T for 15 years and she's been thinking of changing her internet service provider. She wants to know if she can keep her AT&T email, though. Leo says no. That's an AT&T domain name and as such, once she cancels her account, the email will get shut down.

Tamar wants to move to Time Warner Cable, but she doesn't want to get rid of her TV service through DirecTV. Leo says she doesn't have to have cable TV through Time Warner, she could just get internet. It may cost her about $10-20 more, though.

How can I improve my bandwidth for streaming?

George from San Jose, CA

Episode 1092

George wants to know if he can create his own bandwidth. Leo says that bandwidth is created by a network of devices that provide it's share of bandwidth.The more devices, the more bandwidth. Netflix, for instance, has more bandwidth because it has far more distribution to handle the streaming of video data. And there's other networks that interconnect with each other to create more bandwidth and switches. You can't really create bandwidth at home. The only way he could generate more bandwidth is to pay for it.

Netflix Says Netherlands Has the Fastest Internet Access

Episode 1040

Netflix, which just recently launched in Holland, has been there long enough now to say that people who watch Netflix in the Netherlands get the best bandwidth. Mexico ranks last, just below Ireland and the US.

Netflix says Netherlands has the fastest broadband (CNET)…

Why is my video streaming buffering so much on my Roku?

Joanna from Marina Del Rey, CA

Episode 1035

Joanna is having trouble with streaming video frequently stopping and downgrading in quality on her Roku. It's only about 6 feet away from her router, and she even hard wired it and still had trouble. Leo says that indicates an issue with her ISP. It doesn't help that 40% of all internet traffic after 6pm tends to be streaming video traffic. That can cause a lot of buffering since there's only so much bandwidth.

How much bandwidth should I buy on 3G?

Episode 959

Corina from California

Corina wants to get a mobile device that she can stream video to watch. How much bandwidth should she get for a 3G tablet? Leo says that 8GB is usually fine, but if she's going to stream video from it, it's better to stream via WiFi and not 3G. Video takes up a lot bandwidth and she can burn through 1GB an hour watching it. Most portable devices have a memory for WiFi that it's near, and will automatically join a hotspot.