What's the best inexpensive audio restoration software?

Episode 1472

David from Hollywood, CA

David got some iZotope software from the LAPostProduction Users group for restoring audio and he needs to upgrade it. Is there an alternative that isn't so expensive? Leo says that iZotope is the standard and it comes with free plugins, but the freebies are usually very limited. VST is the standard for the plugins they use, so if he can find some VST plugins, and there are thousands of them, he can use those.

Should I buy a Chromebook?

Episode 1399

James from San Francisco, CA
Samsung Chromebook Plus

James is looking to get a Chromebook, but he's thinking that as a musician, he may need a Windows machine. Are there online ways around it? Leo says that there are online resources to record audio. Leo says that Chromebooks are great for most people, but it may not be for everything he does. Leo says that before he buys, he should try using nothing but the Chrome browser exclusively for a few days and see if there's extensions that can do what he wants. Leo's guessing that for recording music, the Chromebook may be lacking and he would need a full OS like Windows.

Can I record and edit audio with a Chromebook?

Greg from Van Nuys, CA

Episode 1368

Greg wants to know if he can use a Chromebook to record and edit audio recordings. Leo says that newer ChromeBooks support the use of Android apps from the Play Store and that would give you access to audio recording apps. There's also multiple cloud-based audio editors where you save in the cloud and edit through the Chrome browser. Here's good list here. Soundcloud. Twisted Wave.

How can I get rid of a clicking sound in my recording?

Episode 1266

Sigmund from London, England
Yeti Microphone

Sigmund recently had heart surgery and they replaced one of his heart valves. It 'ticks' rather loudly, though. Leo says that Dr. Mom says it's not unusual for mechanical heart valves to have an audible ticking noise. Leo says that some mics, mostly condenser mics, are very sensitive and can pick up the faintest of sounds. That's why most studios use dynamic mics. They don't pick up a lot of external sounds. But condenser mics can be tuned to not pick up that. Sigmund should find that in his Yeti settings. He can also "declick" the audio recording through recording software.

How can I hear myself in my headphones while using a USB mic?

Episode 1248

Mike from Portland, ME
Audio-Technica ATR2100-USB Cardioid Dynamic Microphone

Mike is a guest on a few podcasts, and he usually uses his Audio-Technica ATR2100-USB microphone. He also plugs in headphones to his sound card. But he can't hear himself as he talks into the microphone. Leo suggests plugging his headphones into the mic itself. Leo says the reason the sound from the mic is disabled when he plugs into the sound card is because there's a slight delay, which can be very distracting. If he plugs into the mic directly, he'll be able to hear himself without any delay.