4K

Scott Wilkinson

Episode 1089

Leo just upgraded to Comcast's more professional internet package and it doesn't come with bandwidth shaping or caps and Netflix runs so much better. But it wasn't cheap. Scott says that moving forward, that's what you're going to need when we get into the 4K world, because ISPs are going to want to buffer the content that uses that much data.

Should I buy a Sony 4K TV?

Episode 1076

Marcos from Glendora, CA
Sony 4K TV

Marcos needs Leo's opinion of a Sony 65" 4K TV for $3995, which comes with the media player. Leo says that Sony has to give away the media player because there's no other 4K content out there at the moment, and that's the biggest issue. But does it cost more than it should for this? Leo says that even though the price is incredible for what he's getting, he doesn't think it's time to buy a 4K TV yet.

Scott Wilkinson and NAB in 4K

Episode 1071

Scott Wilkinson

Scott is heading to NAB this week to see what the professionals are doing with 4K. Scott is interested because it will largely impact the standards of ultra high definition moving forward, and that will greatly drive the consumer market. But how will content be graded by pros to take advantage of the new standard? That hasn't been determined yet and Scott will see where it's going at NAB. There's also trends in high dynamic range and color gamut, which are going to provide a broader range of colors with ultra high definition.

Scott Wilkinson

Episode 1059

Scott Wilkinson

Scott is back with questions about how 4K will affect 3D and what glasses would be best. Sony uses both, but Samsung and LG both use passive technology. Vizio went with the passive glasses in 2013, but this year they dumped 3D altogether. Scott says he likes passive glasses because they're lighter and the TVs are more affordable. Passive is brighter, but even then it only lets in 50% of the light. Active glasses lets in only 30% of the light, and you have to recharge them or change the batteries. Scott also says the one good thing is that 4K offers 1080p in each eye for 3D.

How will higher screen resolutions affect gaming in the future?

Anthony from Houston, TX

Episode 1047

Anthony is wondering what will happen for gaming with screens that are surpassing even the retina display resolutions. Leo says that the more resolution there is, the more power it will need to process it. So it makes sense that if there's four times more work, the computer will need more power to push it. Leo says that for gaming, from the perspective of the user, higher resolutions won't necessarily look any better. So it's likely that gaming will stay at 1080p for awhile.

Scott Wilkinson

Episode 1047

Scott Wilkinson

Scott is back from CES, and he actually walked over 24 miles looking at the latest gadgets and HDTVs. He saw a lot of 4K, and TVs with curved screens. Leo says there's no real benefit from a curved screen, and Scott says that's especially true at the smaller 50" sizes. But for a bigger 105" TV, it may help.

CES: Much Ado About Nothing

Episode 1047

Although Leo sent a crew to Las Vegas for CES, he avoided it and watched it from afar. He says that we didn't really miss anything. The Chinese TV manufactuers like HiSense and TCL announced some interesting 4K TVs, including one with Roku incorporated in it, called the "RokuTV." The better news is that content is finally arriving with deals for streaming by Netflix, Sony, and others. But who's going to be able to watch it with bandwidth caps on the Internet? Should you go out and buy a 4K TV? Leo says there's no real need right now. Wait until things settle down in the market.

Should I get a 4K TV?

Dave from Northridge, CA

Episode 1026

Dave wants to know if he should get a 4K TV right now. Leo says no. There's no 4K content right now, nor any easy way to get it. UHD is just not ready for primetime yet. So he can go ahead and get another HDTV. TV manufactures are just trying to get people to buy it because HD sales have plateaued.

Will Ultra High Definition be worth getting?

Hamit from Denbury, CT

Episode 1015

Hamit is blind, but he's interested in getting a 4K UHD TV. Hamit got Blu-ray for the audio, and he wonders if he'll need to use UHD. Leo says that with 4 times the resolution, he'd get 4 times the data. With UHD, more dots equal more data and the content will come down via streaming or a new disc that will handle 4 times the data. Leo suspects that compression will get better and better and storage will get better as well. All those things will meet in the middle and once UHD is mainstream, the workflow will be there to support it.