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Episode 1196 June 14, 2015

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Audience Questions

Audience QuestionsHour 1

Hour 1 Hour 2 Hour 3
Watch Diane from Riverside, CA Comments

Diane updated her iPhone 5S to iOS 8 and now it's not running properly. She clicks on one app and another one opens. Leo says that there's always the potential of something going wrong when updating an operating system. It's like trying to pull a table cloth out from under dishes and trying to put another table cloth in its place.

The fix is easy -- Diane should reset, erase and start over. Leo says it sounds like a broken digitizer though, and Apple should replace it for no charge. Since Diane is out of warranty, she can get it replaced for $140, which isn't bad. Still, there's a chance the Genius at the Apple Store will replace it for free if she's really nice.

Watch Ed from Valencia, CA Comments

Ed downloaded the game "Middle Earth: Shadow of Modor," and then got a message that said "installed video does not support DirectX features." Leo says that this is one of the reasons why he prefers console games because they don't do things like this. But in Windows, the PC has to meet the games' specifications.

He should check out his optional updates in Windows to see if there's a new version of DirectX available. Real time rendering is more of a challenge than video playback though, so it's odd that he'd end up with this issue. A stand alone video card may help, and he could get one for less than $100. He can also try updating his video card drivers.

Watch Art from Los Angeles, CA Comments

Art wants to register a domain name and be sure that he owns the website. Leo says that is important. He won't want to let a web host register it for him because they could end up owning the domain. Then he'd have to try and pry it from their clutches. So Art should go to a domain registrar first, get his domain and then he can go to a webhost and have them set up his site. This way he will keep the domain ownership.

Watch Pete from Clinton Township, MI Comments

Pete is a huge Windows Phone 8 fan. What model should he get? Leo says that the Lumia 1520 is the current flagship, but there's talk that a new model will be coming out soon for Windows Phone 10. But Leo hears that the current beta version of the Windows Phone 10 OS isn't all that great, and he's thinking that it won't be until late Fall. Leo wonders if Microsoft is going to stay in the phone business. It may be a good idea to stick with the Lumia 1520.

Is there a good maps app for Windows Phone? Leo says that Here Maps is great. He can use maps offline and it's free.

Watch Mohammed from Manchester, UK Comments

Mohammed wants to make a professional looking website for his nonprofit organization. Leo says that he can make websites for free at WordPress.com or Blogspot.com, and there are places that will offer web hosting for nonprofits for free.

Leo recommends SquareSpace, though. For $8 a month, he can have a professional looking website with custom designs, templates, etc. Wix is a good one for business. SquareSpace is the best for nonprofits and he can try before he buys for two weeks. The chatroom says that there's a nonprofit webhost made by Google in the UK called GBBO.

(Disclaimer: SquareSpace is a sponsor).

Audience QuestionsHour 2

Hour 1 Hour 2 Hour 3
Watch Danny from New Jersey Comments

Danny's daughter wants to learn to code. How can he get her started? Leo says that HourofCode.com is a great movement to get kids to learn to code. They have events, a curriculum, and a great place to start as a resource. Tynker is a good app for the iPad that will help her to learn iOS coding.

What about Code School? Leo says that is for web coding, as is Code Academy. But it's good to learn theory and different kinds of code. Leo suggests starting with Tynker to learn the fundamentals. Another option is Scratch. It's great for that. After Tynker, she should dive into Apple's Swift language.

Danny might also check out AppCamp4Girls.com, although it's all on the west coast.

Watch Guy from Ventura, CA Comments

Guy wants to change his keyboard to an ABCDEF type keyboard. Leo says that's not a good idea because QWERTY is the standard everywhere. But Leo can see why it would be beneficial from an accessibility point of view.

There is a site called AppleVis which talks about an ABCDEF keyboard for iOS devices and Apple just opened up iOS8 for third party keyboards. So it's only a matter of time before someone writes one.

ScooterX in the chatroom says that there is one called KidsKeyboard, which is a simple ABC layout for iOS. It's $0.99.

Watch Beth from Laguna Woods, CA Comments

Beth's laptop display is acting up. She turned it on and the display went weird with the colors being off, and the orientation being portrait. Leo says it could be a corrupted video driver. It could also be the ribbon cable in the laptop hinge. It's a cheap fix, but she'll need a technician to repair it. Beth can plug in an external monitor to see if it works. If it does, then she'll know it's a faulty connection. She should ultimately take it in to someone for repair.

Watch Dina from Manhattan Beach, CA Comments

Dina wants to download her iPhone text messages with time and date. Leo says that the nice thing about the Apple environment is that they all work together. So the program that she uses for text messages, also works on the Mac if she sets it up that way. Then all the messages will appear there.

Another option is eCamm's Phoneview for $30. Dina can try before she buys and it will let her save all of her messages and data. They come in a PDF format when she saves them.

Watch Dina from Manhattan Beach, CA Comments

Dina also wants to get her husband a new laptop, but he doesn't like Apple. What about the Microsoft Surface? Leo says that the Surface 3 is great. She doesn't need the pro version, which is $1300. But the Surface 3 is a small, light tablet that a keyboard can attach to. It also comes with Office. Dina should check out the Microsoft Store for more.

Watch Karen from Pacific Palisades, CA Comments

Karen has had breakins in her area lately and wants to get a security system for not only her home, but also looking out to the street. Leo says she has two choices - one to record locally, and one that records to the Cloud. Leo says that the Cloud option, which is done by DropCam, enables her to access her feed from the internet and she can easily go back in time. They're all driven by Wi-Fi and Leo used to use them at the Brickhouse all the time. DropCam is a Google owned company.

Another option is Arlo Wireless by NetGear. ADT does have a system without monthly monitoring, so she can go mainstream. There are hundreds of them out there that can handle it. But what she wants is the ability to not only be notified when there's movement, but also to access that feed online when she's away.

Audience QuestionsHour 3

Hour 1 Hour 2 Hour 3
Watch Julian from Los Angeles, CA Comments

Julian is looking at the Apple Watch but heard that Leo thinks it's "dopey." Leo says that it is, but that's true with all smart watches right now. If Julian has a purpose for it, then it can be useful. But it's really more of a status symbol, even if it does have some interesting features.

Julian is blind, and he likes the accessibility features of interacting with his phone because the watch can talk as well. He likes that it can interface with Siri and Voiceover helps to read the time. It's an ideal solution for accessiblity and limited mobility.

Watch Steve from Vancouver, Canada Comments

Chris wants to create his online community, but he's concerned that using Facebook or Twitter will make it owned by them or shut him down. Leo says that is true but it's an easy place to start, and that's also where all the eyeballs are. Leo recommends going with Google+ because he'll get the Hangouts feature, messaging, and even Google groups.

If he really wants to do it right, it's best to make his own website with those capabilities. That way he can control it if his community gets shut down. He also wants to take donations. Leo says that SquareSpace has a great cash donation payments option.

Watch John from Merced, CA Comments

John was going to get a used computer, but thought maybe a Chromebook would be a better option. Leo says the Chromebook is a great computer. It's only a browser based system and often, that is all you need. And plus, buying someone's used computer means you're buying someone else's problems. Anything in the Chrome browser can be done, including video editing. And the price is right at $250. You can't beat that. Samsung, Acer. The Pixel is one of Leo's favorites. Windows is way more than most people need and we should start to recognize that.

Watch Rusty from Mobile, AL Comments

Rusty is an open source fan and has heard about the Ubuntu phone. Should he wait for it? Leo says that he's a fan of Ubuntu but it's very unfinished and he imagines that a phone OS is probably going to be the same. It's primarily aimed at emerging markets where price is a consideration. If you like Ubuntu, it's probably very usable. But there won't be a lot of apps for it and that's going to be a frustration,.

Watch Matthew from Virginia Comments

Matthew is having issues with WiFi when he moves to the second floor. Leo says it's important to remember that WiFi is about 150' in distance. But things can get in the way and dilute the signal, especially metal. An extender will help but you want an extender that is made by the same as your router. Leo has three of them. ActionTec is what Matthew's router is and they do address extenders here. That's the most affordable option. Then there's powerline networking that uses the electrical cable in your walls as networking cables. Lastly, if you could get into the walls, laying Ethernet cable is the best. But that can be expensive.

Matthew is having issues also with his Lets play videos. Leo says it sounds like bandwidth issues.

Watch Jim from Los Angeles, CA Comments

Jim is frustrated because he'll be watching a video on his phone and it'll buffer. Leo says that's a speed/bandwidth issue. Streaming will buffer about 30 seconds of video before starting to get ahead. Then if the packets come out of order or slow down, the buffer is there. If it happens a lot, the buffer will just run out and rebuffer. So it has to do with connection, bandwidth, and the ability of your system to keep up. Faster internet will solve the problem, as will a lower resolution stream.